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Snaring for Survival
Answers to Your Questions

All questions are answered in depth in our book Snaring for Survival.

The most typical questions we receive include:

1.  What animals can be snared in my area of the United States?

2.  What is the population of the animals I intend to snare?

3.  How many snares should I set?

4.  How many snares should I buy?

5.  What tools do I need to set snares?

6.  Should I buy short or long snares?

7.  Are your snares built from quality materials?

8.  Are your snares built by an experienced snareman?

9.  What's the difference between a Survival Snare and a regular snare used by fur trappers?

Turtle Trapping
 
What animals can be snared
in my area?
Question & Answer
First, check your state's hunting and trapping regulations for season information. This is the best place to start your research. The bag limits listed in the regulations will give you a good idea of population density. High bag limits mean you can be sure there is a good population density.

What is the population of
the animals I intend to snare?
The help determine population, scout your area. Take a walk and find animal trails. Where are they coming from and where do they go? You can use bait piles or scent stations, plus use your game camera to show the visiting animals to your station. Remember, you can't catch what's not there.

How many snares should I set?

The easy answer is 'enough to feed you and your family.' At a minimum, I like to have 12 of each size snare that allows me to catch a variety of game. For survival, have at least 4 dozen on hand. In a survival situation, I'd prefer to have 4 dozen each of our small, medium and large survival snares.

Our Videos
Master Wild Hog Snaring
Master Wild Hog Snaring
Newt Sterling has developed and designed equipment and methods in a system guaranteed to catch and hold hogs ranging in size from piglets to the largest boar. This in-depth 2 hour and 49 minute video contains info on neck snares, foot snares, snare treatment, shocksprings, swivels, bait stations and more.
$39.95 Each

Master Mink & Muskrat Snaring
Master Mink and Muskrat Snaring
Welcome to the world of Mink & Muskrat Snaring! Many trappers wonder WHY snare these fur bearers, with the body grip and foot traps available to us trappers to use. This DVD by Newt Sterling covers that exact question and more; locations, tools, etc.
$34.95 Each

Master Raccoon Snaring
Master Raccoon Snaring
Learn in great detail how to make snares and various sets for raccoon. Featuring music by Jake Krack with the Whoopin Hollar String Band. Video by Newt Sterling is 140 minutes
$34.95 Each

 
Master Beaver Snaring
Master Beaver Snaring
Follow Newt Sterling to the swamps and flooded timber of North Carolina, snaring beaver with his unique methods and equipment. Learn how to avoid otters when they are out of season, and still take beaver. Learn sets that you might not typically associate with snares, and see how they are made. Learn to apply his KISS (Keep It Simple, Stupid) System of beaver snaring.
$34.95 Each

Cable Restraints
Cable Restraints
Learn the fundamentals of Cable Restraints: What they are made of, how to build them, how to treat them, methods of anchoring, and setting them on the line.
$34.95 Each

Otter'ly Simple
Otterly Simple
This is an instructional course by pro trappers Newt Sterling and Clint Locklear on targeting otter - not just catching a few by accident.
$39.95 Each

River'n with Clint & Newt
River'n
Learn how to take red fox, coyote, bobcats, greyfox, coon, and beaver from a boat and canoe. This is an instructional tape that covers footholds, body grips and snares. Locations are covered in detail.
$39.95 Each

Turtles by the Ton
Turtles by the Ton
Follow Newt Sterling and Clint Locklear on their North Carolina turtle line. Learn how they use different styles of traps and locations to catch 1,100 pounds of turtles in 4 days. Plus see how to put up your turtles for the frying pan or soup pot.
$39.95 Each

Personal Instruction
Newt Sterling
Newt Sterling is a North American Trappers Historical Society’s Hall of Fame recipient, and one of the top American names in snaring.
Professional snare and trapline instruction is available, either on your line or his. Special group rates are available. Contact us for more information.

 
 
How many snares should I buy?

Question & Answer
Ask yourself: How long am I going to be gone? How long will I need to snare for my meat source? How many people do I need to feed? Do I know how to preserve a large animal to prevent spoilage?
Tough questions that must be answered. Obviously a dozen snares won't be enough.
My best answer is A LOT!
What tools do I need to set snares?

The short answer is: your survival knife. A little longer answser is that nearly all snares are set using annealed wire, and 14, 11 and 9 gauge are the most commonly used sizes.
In my book, I teach a good method using 14 gauge wire, but in a survival situation you might not have wire. Learn about alternate methods in the book as well.
Do I buy short or long snares?

My shortest Survival Snare is 60" and that one is made for smaller animals such as squirrel. Our 3/64" 1x19 Survival Snare is 72 inches long. With that size, you can loop around a 6" tree, make a 6" loop and still have 42 inches to reach the center of the trail.
You decide -- what's your life worth? A few dollars saved by buying short snares -- or a few more dollars a dozen for Survival Snares.

Are your snares built
from quality materials?
Question & Answer
When buying my cable and other snaring gear, all must be made of quality materials. I sell nothing unless I have used it on my own snarelines, which have been my major source of income for over 30 years. The best snares begin by using the best cable, and premier cable does not come from China. An honest, reputable Korean mill provides some of the best cable on today's market.
Are your snares built by an
experienced snareman?
An experienced snareman KNOWS snares. He must, because his life depends on it. Quality defects can be discovered by a quick look or feel. Building Survival Snares is nothing like 'stringing beads.' You must have a 'feel' for it. By that, I mean the experience of building thousands of snares. Our book goes into detail about a snare 'cast' and snare 'loading' and knowing the end stops won't fail.
What's the difference
between Survival Snares
and trapping snares?
A Survival Snare is typically longer than a fur snare, and is made of the best quality materials available.
End stops and locks are put on in such a way that they are stronger than the cable itself. In addition, Survival Snares do not have deer stops, loop limit stops or break away devices.
Survival Snares are made to catch and hold an animal as if your LIFE DEPENDS ON IT.

About Snaring for Survival

Owner Newt Sterling has been a lifelong hunter, trapper and snaresman. In addition, he's the author of several instructional books and videos.

Above all, Newt wishes to share his skills so that others may be better prepared when America finds itself in a state of chaos. It is his sincere hope that the information he provides will help save the lives of those who prepare.

 
             Contact

  Address

7 Bates Lane

Port Republic,  NJ  08241

Phone

609-338-7011

 

About Snaring for Survival

Owner Newt Sterling has been a lifelong hunter, trapper and snaresman. In addition, he's the author of several instructional books and videos.

Above all, Newt wishes to share his skills so that others may be better prepared when America finds itself in a state of chaos. It is his sincere hope that the information he provides will help save the lives of those who prepare.

             Contact

  Address

 

7 Bates Lane

Port Republic,  NJ  08241

Phone

609-338-7011